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would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
around the world are concerned about it. it used to be the case that they were more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed. they often ask about it and its resolution. >> what do you think the impact could be globally? we're looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> the u.s. is about 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of the fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth, it is going to have repercussions around the world. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worried about this? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. to have that large player virtually shut in a recession would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not think that's at the moment. we do not want to have this effect on a french our recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill and to th
anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it's an honor to have you guys here. enjoy the day and it's an honor to welcome jane back to th
we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot
the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, they will not give up power. i hear going to have some sort of a renewed dictatorship in the middle east. g
. john's church. >> let us bow our heads in prayer. let us pray. gracious god who has blessed us with this good land for our heritage, we pray that we may always prove ourselves to be a people mindful of your favor and glad to do your will. we pray that you will save us from violence, discord and confusion, from pride, arrogance and fear of each other, defend our liberties and fashion into one nite people the multitudes brought here out of many nations and languages. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit those to whom we have entrusted the authority of our government, that there may be justice and peace at home and that we may be a plessing to all the nations of the world. in the time of pross terty, fill our parties with thankfulness and in the day of trouble let us not lose our trust in you. let this national tree be a reminder that in some inexplicable way you are standing with us at all times. all this we ask in your most holy name, amen. >> good evening. on behalf of the national park foundation and national park service it is a great privilege to present
question, i just wanted to clarify something or bring it to your attention, a lot of us here today work for the administration in this building which is actually is a pump station still in use that uses diesel pumps to pump the water from the ocean so it's not just a fire house, it's also us being exposed to diesel exhaust, and so with you mentioned this gal, rachel, is she the person who's not here today, or when you were talking about the air quality, having your air quality tested, and the odd thing is now a different agency runs and maintains these pumps that are right beneath us now so it gets kind of complicated, but i think i've been exposed, i worked at the airport for 11 years and then worked here, i have this exposure to diesel smell that you don't notice it here, i do notice it frequently, and so when you mention this gal rachel. >> so, just before this, we had a meeting because we're working on hopefully building a study to look at exposures among women in the fire course to understand what they're exposed to, this raises a really interesting kind of unique sub population wi
to raise a child". it truly does and takes everyone of us and people in the community, our education community, our native american health center community, our crc community because once they leave us then somebody else has to pick up where we left off and carry that ball to educate the students and i see the students and it's good to see you guys and i thank you for being here and honor all of us, and keep your prayers open for hinttelethat it will always be there. if i can hang in for a couple more years i hope to retire. knock on wood. thanks for being here and each of you drive safely and thank you for your prayers and blessings and those that come before us and those coming into the world. hi pop. [applause] >> shirley, shirley. >> all my x's kids of taught by shirley. i'm kidding. and again with great pleasure welcome janet king to the stage. [applause] >> hello everybody. i have the great honor and privilege to introduce and to introduce karen harrison who is also receiving this award tonight. karen harrison is a registered nurse and clinic manager at the native americ
in used for different amounts of time. and i have calculated the average duration of servitude based on the different categories, because they are different. again, speak to the importance of doing actual data gathering. you can see that the circumstances get shorter and you can extrapolate a sense in a given year, how many people were in bondage. so, that is one way of going about it. another is to multiplied out and say at this point in time, people are coming in and out. at event -- at any given time, you would have this many. ilo, their number is from your a to your be, there were -- from year a to year b, there were x numbers of slaves in the world. is just a different way of doing mouth. >> thank you for that brilliant, moving keynote address. it is what that conference desperately needed. make no apologies for crunching numbers. i know you are not apologizing. do not get depressed. we will solve all your questions in the next session. if not that one, surely the afternoon session. there is coffee upstairs. we want you back in 10, maximum 15 minutes. thank you very much. [appla
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
's unique, vertically challenged terrain. we are still using cars a century old >> the old cable car is the most unique thing, it's still going. it was a good design by then and is still now. if we don't do something now. it's going to be worse later. >> the cable cars are built the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go >> hi,. in this episode, we are featuring the romantic park
building. that's achieved by using rainwater for landscaping, treating wastewater on-site for reuse in the building's toilets. >> the machine is an ecological waste treatment system for water resouls. so, the living machine to accelerate what happens naturally in nature is biomimickery that happens in tidal estuaries. it brings in nutrients to the microbes. it's delivered in the air, and does the rest of the process, chewing up those nutrients in the water and producing nitrogen and carbon. we're doing that in a system where we're creating 12 to 16 tides per day. >> the wastewater for our building begins its journey by travel tog our primary tank which is a fairly normal looking manhole. beneath these manholes is a 10,000 gallon primary tank. there are two chambers. the trash chamber which filters out the trash and plastics and the organic solids settle out just as normal wastewater treatment process is. the water then flows to an equalization tank, a recirculation tank, and then on to tidal flow wetlands cell 1a. all those these cells look to be only 3 or 4 feet deep, they're actu
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
to see if there are other sources to still keep us on schedule that deliver the projects that we committed. and move forward on this entire package of projects. i think we're going to try to do that in the next couple months and when this recommendation comes back, not only can we fund these projects, these are federal funds so it's important that unlike second street, last time we're able to soak up these funds, spend the money and deliver the projects and try to deliver all of them whatever shape or form. >> i go want to support for these projects. as we see every single day in san francisco. i wanted to say quickly about the application. we are talking to them and we have worked with them in the past looking at other ways to get a lot of their ideas and energy mobilized and on the ground. the paving alone is needed and something we hear unanimously. this valley a great time to be adding in some of the innovative bicycle improvement. the plan is in front of you today is part of this obag list really moved the hearts of directors and they produced unanimous vote. we're really e
a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepren
. >> the real threat at the moment is here with us. >> what happened if nothing happens with mark zandi, jackie calmes. >> politically, the speaker is playing with a weaker hand than the president. the pressure is higher on him, and his critics are louder, too. >> just need boehner to go along with raising the rates and that's it. republican party is finished. >> he is selling out our children right now with these massive tax increases, and that's his starting bid. he is saying here is $800 billion, now will you sit down with, us a obama? >> hashtags with names like fire boehner have become popular. still, where the votes get counting, boehner seems to have more room to maneuver than he did in preelection faceoffs. but it begs the question, even if the republican speaker gets a deal, can he get it passed? joining me now is tom cole of oklahoma, martha blackburn of tennessee, thank you both for joining us, and i think that's really the key question that we keep hearing. they'll get a deal -- they'll get something. but it doesn't matter if the two of them get a deal, it matters if the speaker has
, the main thesis is the 300 million gouda recognizers and they're all basically using the same algorithm and is recognizers connect themselves in a hierarchy. the neo cortex can develop these ideas were. that's the essence of it. they basically running the same method in secret of human thought is the ability to build a hierarchy with other recognizers. so at a low level where recognition simple things like the crossfire and a higher level you have thomasa as an apple. it's a much higher level. that was funny, that was ironic. they are the same except for the position in the hierarchy. produce a hierarchy come with? were not with warren -- [inaudible] we are not born with that knowledge of english or chinese. in fact, all of these connections reflect memories, personality. the neo cortex creates from our own experience. so the more important you are what you think. the grandson has laid down several layers. you basically can work on one-liner at a time. >> host: the layers have been sent to some extent by biology come at a geometric information. >> guest: the ability to create the layers
>> here tees within. >> not only should we not use the term "lunatic" eliminate the term "lunatic," we should also use the term to feed those who want to continue doing business as usual around this town. >> we have no words to add to this story. thank you for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.comotu for analysis and extras. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." fareed zakaria is next from here and parts of the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you around the states and the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show. first up, with washington as an impasse, an exclusive conversation with unof america's greatest deal makers. james bake eric former secretary of state, former secretary of treasury, former white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and on what his party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon. with a similar effort, we can now cure ca
, and we have been asking her to fight for us, but he is her tenant, too. so i don't know the situation. >> what is the landlord's name? >> sarah? >> do you have a last name? >> it's right here. >> thank you. >> any other questions? >> how long have you been a tenant? >> since april 1st of this year. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> hi. i am anna. i am a roommate of hannah's. i actually live immediately right next to the hood vent. i have a drawing that is really sketchy, but these are my two windows. my roommate alex lives into this room and this looks into our kitchen. one morning i woke up, completely unannounced to have a man working right here. that was when we first learned that they were doing something with the roof. and then i woke up one morning and the hood vent was starting to be built. but i'm actually really worried about fire. my light is decreased in the light well, but i mean it's something that could happen, but amount of space where somebody could come in the event of fire and there will be grease and everything that is sucked up from the hood vent in t
petroleum institute. >>> on new years day, and during the first week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans
. thank you, phil ginsberg and the hatchery for hosting us. i use open data. our company was founded three years ago using open data. we are one of the first sustainable companies to use open data and be sustainable innovation, meaning we can generate revenue and keep mobile applications for government going. we are really excited to be here today. this is our official launch of apple-liscious. i would like to thank our team, kevin, rick robbins, moment of all [speaker not understood] for my cto and co-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public art which has now been thanks to sean working late last night, putting the public arts into golden gate park. this is providing access. it's providing efficiency, and it's providing new revenue streams and op
or progress on our behalf. maybe they just aren't listening to us any more. it occurred to me if they won't listen to us i wonder if they will listen to a stronger voice. i wonder if they will listen to god? walls of water party, or signs and watonders. sometimes you speak them in a still small voice. since the leaders from either party don't seem to listen to us wonder what would happen if we asked god to speak to them so maybe they would listen to him. it may be a good day for somebody to have more of a million voice march on capitol hill. what if millions of americans simply prayed that day for our nation our leaders and. i am not talking about partisan prayer. i am not sure the almighty would register with either of the parties we have now. not even a political prayer. i am not sure what the creator would like to reveal. what if millions of americans just set aside a few minutes to pray for each other or the president or congress, governor, mayor legislators or children's future. you don't have to believe like me or pray like me i am sure we can figure out if we are sincere. i am aski
natural disaster and failed bury rock sees. >> the surprise to everybody including to us is that we could do it all pretty much without batting an eye lash. >> a prominent evangelical leader reflects on 25 years in the culture wars. plus, menorahs and lighting the hanukkah lamps. >> welcome. i'm bob aber nathy. it's good to have you with us. members of congress came together for the annual lighting of the capitol christmas tree, although they were deadlocked on matters. religious groups advocated for action on the fiscal cliff and other issues. a coalition of religious leaders, law enforcement and business people urged lawmakers to prioritize immigration reform. the group included both liberal and conservative clergy who called for legislation that respects the dignitiy of immigrants and creates a pathway to citizenship and secures the border. >> it's time to secure on you values, values that include, faith and hope and charity. >> jewish groups are divided over israel's plans to construct new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. the controversial announcement came a day after
.com/sotu for analysis and extras. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." fareed zakaria is next from here and parts of the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you around the states and the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show. first up, with washington as an impasse, an exclusive conversation with unof america's greatest deal makers. james bake eric former secretary of state, former secretary of treasury, former white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and on what his party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon. with a similar effort, we can now cure cancer. that whees the head of the largest cancer center in the world, houston's m.d. anderson says. you want to hear why we're so close to success and yet so far. >>> and merge has lost its numb were one standings in lots of areas from competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce?
memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director of the bell "honor flight" -- the film "honor flight." there are many other distinguished guests to give a welcome to our honored guests, the pearl harbor survivors and all of our world war ii veterans and your families. and a very warm welcome to all veterans and their families with us. a special thank you to those serving in our armed forces and their families. what a magnificent job they have done in iraq and are doing in afghanistan. their performance of duty has been magnificent. we cannot say enough about those
, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box of plastic bags, it lasts me l
and resolve to stand no matter the cost. made those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of strength. for those who remained with us today, received renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we asked for york and seizing grace and bountiful blessings on them -- your unceasing grace and bountiful blessings on them. as we forge forward, committed to building superlative global unity and peace. amen. >> ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. >> our first speaker today is represent as the co-host for today's ceremony for the nationals -- national parks service, mr. robert vogel, superintendent of the national memorial parks. [applause] >> good afternoon. on behalf of the national parks service, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the world war ii memorial, which is dedicated to the valiant soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines who fought in that war. as the superintendent of the national mall and memorial park, i have the true honor of serving as the custodian of this memorial. also ensuring that the story of the brave men and women w
a couple weeks ago, not even earlier, maybe about a month in a half ago. this was mentioned about the use of pc land and this corner in the northeast section of the pc land. to me it seems like a flexible use of land that helps enable different projects moving forward. what is that little corner, that triangle what is that used for? >> they lease it to an asphalt plant but they own the underlying piece of property. my understanding is that the short term lease and so, that may not be a long term use. >> thank you. >> good morning mr. chairman and commissioners. i think that there is no question that the poc has been a partner and they will continue to be at the table as this project goes through further stages of analysis and we see what the cost and further technical challenges are to implementing it. as with any other where there's land use that's adjacent facilities there's an opportunity to capture some of that value, they are at the table as a potential funding partner. we are fully aware of that. we are aware they won. the time is fairly early in the process. i'll just note that we
important issue, a fundamental issue, they failed to get a permit for change in use from the previous use to a less than 50 restaurant >> thank you. >> and the last thing is what is more important and this is a housing issue, these are the windows. here we show one window, there are five windows in this light well and where they have drawn this shaft is directly in front of a bedroom window. directly in front of a dining window, which is a significant housing complaint in my discussions with rose marie the chief housing official this morning, they said this duct could never be in the shaft. no way, no how. >> thank you. >> we can hear from the permit-holder now. >> good evening madame chair lady and good evening members of the board. my name is gus and even as you look at, this we have a lot of contradictions that are occur. now we only came across these citations this evening, at least i did and we had basically no time to respond to them. to make matters worse, you have a citation dated on the 3rd of december. you have another here dated the 4th of december. they are diametricall
and rolling and 20 seconds later put down the phone. here in fairfax county police are using a law fillure to pay full attention who texting or distracted behind the wheel. >> not a day goes by without noticing another driver texting while driving. the officers are doing what they can to enforce it. >> these kinds of violations have skyrocketed. in 2009, about 7,000 offenses. in 2010, over 9,000. last year and this year, close to 12,000 offenses. here in virginia, a number of bills are being drawn up that would make the penalties for texting and driving tougher. the problem is that in the commonwealth, texting and driving is a secondary offense. meaning you can't be pulled over just for texting alone. carl rally's 19-year-old son kyle was killed a year and a half ago because of an apparent texting and driving case. kyle's car broke down near his home and kyle got out to push and he was then hit. records show the driver who hit him was his phone. >> texting. not texting, not looking at the road while driving the car which -- turns into a weapon because of the complicated way virginia laws a
't. spending three terrifying days in captivity. when u.s. intelligence showed joseph's life was in imminent danger, the military made its move. >> a hostage rescue mission is highly, highly dangerous and there is a risk that the hostage him or herself, would be killed. you never someone to authorize the mission. >> reporter: the mission was authorized by general john allen. he was lifted safely to bag ram air base but the victory came at the price. this morning a u.s. service member injured died of his wounds. the ultimate saf fis to save an american dr. who would vn oath wooiss been killed. >> muhammad lila with us. they get the kidnapping was a secret and the recue as well. >> the first 72 hours are critical. this is a civilian hostage. he doesn't have the survival training that a soldier does. and publicizing the kidnapping would further endanger his life. >> our thoughts are the service member's family, thank you. >>> we turn a mexican-american icon. deloved, and flying from a concert when the plane she was on disappeared mid flight. more on the search tonight. >> reporter: mexican auth
kurtz. you can check us out every monday. we're back here next sunday more, 11:00 a.m. eastern. state of union with candy crowley is right now. >>> to recap the past week of activity atop the fiscal cliff, nothing happened. today the search for a sweet spot between the deal the speaker can get from the president and the one he can sell to his bruised party. >> they have put forward an unbalanced plan that actually lowers rates for the wealthiest americans. >> when is he going to take a step towards us? >> republican house speakers tom cole and marsha blackburn. >>> then falling off the fiscal cliff, a tumble that would shake the world with international monetary fund christine lagarde. >>> plus what happens if nothing happens with moody's chief economist mark zandy, jackie comes of the "new york times" and cnn's dana bash. i'm candy crowley and this is "state of the union." >>> politically the speaker is playing with a weaker hand that the president, the pressure is higher on him and his critics are harder too. >> the republican party's finished. >> he is selling out our childr
for tuesday. we go right back down to 49. >> thanks, gwen. >>> that does it for us this morning. stay tuned for fox news sunday. join us back here tonight at 10:00 for the latest news and weather. see you then. >> chris: i'm chris wallace, two big issues, today. the fiscal cliff talks, stuck in neutral. and, growing concern syria will use chemical weapons, against its own people. ♪ >> c with just 23 days to go, and more posturing than progress, will the white house and republicans cut a deal to avoid big spending cuts and tax increases? we'll talk with two senators on the front lines of the debate. democrat charles schumer, and republican, bob corker. then, the u.s. draws a red line. telling syrian president aassad not to use chemical weapons in the country's civil war. we'll discuss the intelligence and the possible fallout with israel's ambassador to the u.s., michael oren, a fox news sunday exclusive, plus the supreme court agrees to take up same sex marriage. we'll ask our sunday panel what the court is likely to decide, whether gays have a constitutional right to marriage
what we might see in the years to come. let us start by going back a few centuries to a phenomenon all of you will most likely be familiar with. that is of course the north atlantic slave trade. i spent some time in nigeria documenting victims of human trafficking, challenging and terrific scenarios. caught up in a culture of poverty, oppression, organized crime during -- crime. men, women, boys, and growth. i took a visit to a town about two hours west of the capital lagos. here the portuguese built 510 years ago when the first slave trading outpost on the west african coast. that is the building. obviously there is a different route on it. that is the same structure from five centuries ago. records show more than half a million west africans were brought into this building and then take it out to the beach where they were taken into large seafaring vessels and the course taken to the americas. more than half a million. it is important to note that just as many of not more people were taken the other way. the north atlantic trade in slaves get a lot of attention but the asia-pacific t
merchant, a large port operator who was in town for a national symposium. a regular told us, you can get girls here." in an online rough for the same location, a customer said he was shown six women and was asked which one do you want? can you tell us what kind of business is being run here? >> karaoke bar. >> reporter: we found the business' manager john out front. >> reporter: what about all the girls that we see come in here. >> do you see girls right now? >> reporter: we have seen girls. >> this karaoke we have male and female connection here. >> reporter: you have a love connection here? >> yes. >> reporter: is anyone paying to be with his girls? >> that is what i know. i don't really know. >> reporter: we discovered the receipt from cafe juliet while uncovering our investigation that uncovered $a4500 by port of oakland maritime director james k would. we found lawrence dunnigan was reimbursed for thousands of dollars, public money spent at exclusive hotels overseas. some as kwon, dunnigan made repeat visits to the club, a restaurant and club in china. >> there is a mitch you'
. all of us are here to help anyone in need. >> i was also going to recommend that perhaps you also engage -- america media, and san francisco-based pacific news service. you can put something in english and each media outlet reports on their language with no copyright violations. >> great idea. i want to get that information from you after the meeting. >> commissioner kingsley? >> thank you for your report. >> commissioner kingsley: my questions may be a little premature. do we have any information, percentages? >> approximately 1800 clients accessed either language line or an interpretation service from either an officer or a professional. >> of the 1800, is it broken down in terms of what percentage are officers and what is the language line? >> yeah. 1739 times language line was used. 90 percent is language line. >> what is the reaction to the use of language line? is it reliable? they have a sense that getting quality interpretation? >> by the very nature of using the phone and passing the phone three ways it slows the process. there is no doubt about it. when we dig dow
us one description of the birth of jesus. do archaeology and history give us another? joining us to answer these questions areu.s. open, the aute brand new "jesus of nazareth cunning of the and jeffrey sheler author of the brand new "is the bible truth?" >>> tell us what you think happened at bethlehem, jeffrey she'ller. >> well when we read two gospels, only two of the four gospels even talk about the birth of jesus and when we read matthew and luke, those two gospels, we are certainly presented with different details surrounding the story of the birth but despite the differences there are several things that clearly come through and those are the important aspects of the story. one, that jesus was born in bethlehem. to a virgin named mary. whose husband, joseph, was of the lineage of david. and this according to the writers of those two gospels was in fulfillment of the hebrew prophesies. so despite very clear and seemingly troubling contradictions in some of the details the more important thing is, i think, the points on which they disagree. >> on the physical -- on the physic
of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to s
are not using them. when you turp off the light, turn those off, too, so, you can use them if a way that will save you money. >> what about flameless candles, with the batteries you have to use. you can use a flameless candle for a night light, it lights something, yes, it is safe and you don't have to plug anything in. what about the batteries? >> yes e. batteries are not a good thing to throw away. you have to dispose of them properly and there are greener batteries. it is good to buy the ones that last a little longer even if they cost more so you can extend the time before you have to throw them away. >> what about tinsel, glitter and stuff like that? >> you don't want to buy stuff you will toss at the end of the season. it is a wasteful time of year for americans. between thanksgiving and christmas there is 20% more waste. >> aren't we the most wasteful planet in the world, anyway? >> yes. and during the holiday seven we have 20 more tons of landfill material per week during the holiday season. >> yes. if you put your live tree in a certain place, they pick it up, recyc
that and tell americans what we are for. >> in syria, a concern about the possible use of weapons of mass destruction if south. >> the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> the chattering classes are already chatting about 2016. >> look, i am flattered, i am honored. that is not in the future for may. "tim brant's college football captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spe
franchise. >> good evening everyone. thanks for joining us. i'm adam may. it's another tragedy for the nfl. one player is dead and another facing manslaughter charges. a fatal drunk driving accident. >> skid marks line the texas roadway where police say dallas cowboy josh brent lost control of his car killing a teammate. >> it appears as if he was traveling at a high rate of speed at which time his vehicle touched or impacted the outside curb of the service road causing his vehicle to flip at least one time. >> police say brent was driving drunk when he crashed his 2007 mercedes saturday morning. the lineman is charged with intoxication manslaughter for the death of 25-year-old jerry brown, a member of the team's practice squad. brown was unresponsive when they arrived. >> when our officers arrived on scene, mr. brent was removing or dragging mr. brown from the vehicle. >> brent and brown were college teammates at the university of illinois. the two were reunited in october when the cowboys signed brown after the indianapolis colts released h
taxes, not how much to cut spending. should that worry us? it's a deal so disportioned in raising taxes and not cutting spending, what then? a lot of pressure to keep the gravy train running. what if it runs unabated? the unions who legislated the president remind us every day in ads you owe us, mr. president. cut to the chase. no guts, no glory, for now. the risk of a bad deal over no deal. john, what do you think of that? >> well, the democrats, neil, obviously, areot interested in cutting at all. they hold entitlements out, even though they are completely broke, between medicare, medicaid, and social security. there's a hundred trillion dollars in unfunded entitlement liabilities. tax the rich a 100% for the next hundred years. they are intent on preserving them, extending them, and creating them, making them larger meani bigger bills and government control. neil: can't they throw a bone to republicans, offer you at the gate, $800 billion in tax hikes? couldn't you throw it back at them, first thing offered, doubling the tax hikes, $1.6 trillion. a clumsy start from the get-go, but i
to whether or not it's an appropriate use for that location. we're not getting to that argument, that is a question for the planning department to make a determination on if this was not located within a thousand feet of the recreation center this. is located within a thousand feet of the recreation center and it's not a property that can have an mcd on it under the planning code. so i wanted to clarify that. we're not making a determination on the quality of use, but it has the restrictions because of the proximity to another property. with that i'm available to answer questions. thank you. >> mr. sanchez, if you could direct me to the provisions of 790.141 that require or indicate that the measurement must be done in a straight line? i would like to focus on that language. >> so the language included on page 2, in the second paragraph, the language -- the parcel containing an mcd must not be located within a thousand feet. >> let me just -- >> i request can put it on the overhead. >> it's on the 2010 lod as well. is this correct. for example, notification, we notify
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